Peter Chalk Centre

University of Exeter

Stocker Road

Exeter

EX4 4QD

Tel: +44 (0)1392 263637

E-mail: CCWI2019@exeter.ac.uk 

17th International Computing & Control for the Water Industry Conference

1st - 4th September 2019
University of Exeter, UK
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1 Opening and Keynotes

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David Butler

Chair:

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CCWI 2019 Opening

David Butler

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David Butler

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Provost and Senior Deputy Vice-Chancellor, University of Exeter

Janice Kay

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Janice Kay

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Water 4.0 - Riding the Tide, Waves, and Currents

Rebekah Eggers

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Rebekah Eggers

We will begin by establishing the opportunity that this rising tide of digitalization (the transformation possible due to an increase in the scale and speed of existing computing infrastructure and the availability of new computing infrastructures, such as cloud, which has made it cheaper and faster to tackle problems of significant scale using AI) brings by defining and discussing IoT and AI generally using cross industry examples. We will then explore how to be prepared for this inevitable wave and ultimately enable digital transformation in the context of the Water/Wastewater Sector by highlighting the foundational capabilities, applications, and imperatives for our asset intensive industry. Finally, we will inspire thinking around what the current will bring for the future of our industry including block-chain, edge computing, and advanced AI, addressing hurdles such as skill gaps, biases, and ethics along the way.

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Data driven urban water management: What is the potential of knowing more?

Max Maurer

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Max Maurer

The technologies to acquire data is developing fast. We currently operate a real live living lab with a low power sensor network where every node is considerably less than 500 euro and has a battery lifespan of minimally 2 years. Novel transfer protocols (e.g. LoRaMesh) and measurements (e.g. low power conductivity; SQUID) are being developed. Parallel to this we are trying to replace the battery with in-situ energy production. However, the challenge does not end there, as all this data also need to be made useful and productive. Can digitalisation proof itself as a game changer in this highly conservative industry?

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