Peter Chalk Centre

University of Exeter

Stocker Road

Exeter

EX4 4QD

Tel: +44 (0)1392 263637

E-mail: CCWI2019@exeter.ac.uk 

17th International Computing & Control for the Water Industry Conference

1st - 4th September 2019
University of Exeter, UK
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3C Smart systems

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Collaborative

Hwee See

Chair:

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Acoustic Interference De-noising for Adelaide Smart Water Network

Jinzhe Gong

Presenter:

Authors:

Jinzhe Gong, Martin Lambert, Mark Stephens, Chi Zhang and Benjamin Cazzolato

The University of Adelaide and South Australian Water Corporation (SA Water) has been working together in the research and development for the Smart Water Network (SWN) in the Adelaide Central Business District (CBD) since 2017. One component of the SWN is a pipe burst early warning system using distributed acoustic sensors and Internet of Things technologies (IoT). The objective is to provide early warnings of potential pipe bursts, such that appropriate measures can be undertaken to prevent uncontrolled bursts and associated interruptions. This is achieved by the timely detection of emerging leaks induced by newly-formed and stably-growing cracks through the wall of aging cast iron water pipes (which form over 70% of the Adelaide CBD water network). In the period from July 2017 to January 2019, a total of 35 pipe cracks have been detected, reducing the pipe burst rate by more than 50%. A particular challenge encountered in the pioneering burst-early-warning initiative in Adelaide is the various acoustic interference in the busy city environment. Some types of interference (e.g. customer water usage) are difficult to be distinguished from the signal induced by the discharge from through-wall cracks. This makes the timely and robust detection of emerging pipe cracks challenging when the limited measurement is contaminated. This conference presentation will show and play some of the commonly seen interfering signals, discuss the implication to the application of pipe bursts early warning, and demonstrate a de-noising technique for interference suppression.

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A benchmarking framework for evaluating the performance of control algorithms in smart stormwater networks

Sara C. Troutman

Presenter:

Authors:

Sara C. Troutman, Abhiram Mullapudi, Sara P. Rimer and Branko Kerkez

As increased frequency and severity of wet-weather events continue to stress stormwater infrastructures beyond their design capacities, the usage of cyber-physical technology (e.g. sensors, wireless communication, microcontrollers) serves as a low-cost and versatile design alternative for these systems. While leveraging these technologies has led to numerous testbeds of smart stormwater systems, their expanded usage has now generated a need for a systematic and rigorous framework to assess their performance across varying stormwater networks and corresponding storm events. To address this need, we have developed a benchmarking framework that (i) consists of real-world inspired, anonymized stormwater networks, event drivers, and quantifiable control objectives, and (ii) corresponding delineated benchmarking scenarios specifically upon which control algorithms can be tested and compared. This framework is packaged in the open-source Python language library and is hosted online to enable and ease automatic assessment and comparison of submitted control approaches. To demonstrate the utility of this framework, we present (i) the five stormwater networks included in this framework and (ii) the performance of two different control algorithms applied to one of the benchmarking scenarios. Ultimately, this benchmarking framework is an effort to make smart stormwater network control problems accessible to control experts outside of the field of water resources engineering, and water resource engineers unfamiliar with smart stormwater. Our goal is for this benchmarking framework to facilitate future smart stormwater research to focus specifically on the development and implementation of control algorithms, minimizing the prior need to first master stormwater simulation.

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Development and Use of a Digital Twin for the Water Supply and Distribution Network of Valencia (Spain)

Pilar Conejos Fuertes

Presenter:

Authors:

Pilar Conejos Fuertes, Fernando Martínez Alzamora, Marta Hervás Carot and Joan Carles Alonso Campos

Digital Twins are starting to be used in water distribution system in order to improve their management, becoming in the future a crucial tool for the decision-making. But what is a real Digital Twin? In this paper, the authors propose several requirements that should accomplish a Digital Twin of a water distribution system, such as allocating in the model all the real components, the ability to simulate all possible scenarios of the network, the accuratly mimic of all real data, the capacity to be always updated, etc. However, the development of a Digital Twin is a challenge, and it consists of a continuous process of adjustments and learning, which enriches the model with day-to-day knowledge. Aware of the advantages derived from having a Digital Twin of the water distribution system, during the last years Global Omnium has developed a strategy to develop and maintain a Digital Twin of the water distribution network of Valencia and its Metropolitan Area, which approximately supplies water to 1.6 million inhabitants, becoming one of the first utilities to have a Digital Twin connected to the main corporative data sources. The great benefits derived to their use in the daily operation of the system ensure that it will begin to be habitual in the most advanced smart cities.

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A framework for digital transformation of operational water management systems

Henrik Madsen

Presenter:

Authors:

Henrik Madsen

We see an intense focus these years on digital transformation in the water sector. Basically, digital transformation is about utilising new emerging technologies to develop innovative solutions to do things better, smarter and more efficient. The combination of key technology trends such as artificial intelligence, internet of things, digital twin and cloud computing offer very interesting opportunities to develop new digital solutions. These technology trends have already and can further influence the way we manage and operate water systems. A key challenge in the digital transformation is how to capitalise on the increasing volume of data becoming available to improve operations. Today, only 5-10% of data collected in a typical utility is utilised for operational decisions. We have developed a framework for digital transformation of water systems inspired by Gartner’s four-step Analytic Ascendancy Model within business intelligence and analytics. We use this framework to describe the evolution of operational water management systems, adding further value in each step.

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Smart Networks: from Data Analytics to The Digital Twin

David Fortune

Presenter:

Authors:

David Fortune

In the face of the issues facing the water industry, including aging infrastructure, shortage of skills and experience, increased urbanization, increasing population, and climate change, the water industry needs to see improvement in network operations in order to deliver improved service levels at no increase in costs. Smart Networks are set to transform water and wastewater operations: firstly, through increased visibility of flows within the networks, and secondly, through improved control of the networks in real-time. This paper looks at the state-of-the-art for two aspects of smart networks: data analytics and the digital twin. Neither is brand new, yet both are going through significant advances right now, to the extent that trials are underway that really do transform operations. Three implementations of data analytics and digital twin from around the world are reported from Logan City Council (Australia), Bristol Water (UK), and Thames Water (UK). The report describes what sort of monitoring and data communications was installed, how the data analytics and network models were implemented, and what trials have taken place. These three examples show a progression from implementation of advanced data analytics, through trials of digital twin for operational management, right through to everyday use of the digital twin in operations. Such trials showing positive results are an important part of growing trust in smart networks. And with trust will come change to the way everyday network operations are managed. This paper tracks that progress towards the take-over of smart networks for water management.

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