Peter Chalk Centre

University of Exeter

Stocker Road

Exeter

EX4 4QD

Tel: +44 (0)1392 263637

E-mail: CCWI2019@exeter.ac.uk 

17th International Computing & Control for the Water Industry Conference

1st - 4th September 2019
University of Exeter, UK
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4D Building sustainability

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2.1-2.2

Ian Barker

Chair:

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Life Cycle Environmental Impact Analysis of An Emerging Water Infrastructure Paradigm to Recovering Resources from Wastewater

Xu Wang

Presenter:

Authors:

Xu Wang and David Butler

Wastewater resource management has attracted more attention and is included in a number of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. Despite ample opportunities, the transition of wastewater systems from a sole emphasis on pollutant removal to a focus on resource recovery is not easy to realize. This partly because emerging concepts and methods are components of a complex integrated system intended to deliver broad benefits, including water reuse, nutrient recycling, and energy production, and others , while existing infrastructure paradigms have not been designed with these multiple purposes in mind. Moreover, wastewater service systems often function in isolation, relying only on technology to resolve problems and failing to address those factors beyond the traditional scope of engineering. Accordingly, we developed a promising approach to integrate multiple options to reuse pollutants from used water as resources (‘REPURE’ infrastructure. Herein, we used a probabilistic life cycle assessment (LCA) method to trace and assess the environmental sustainability of the selected scenario and integrated process configuration of the REPURE infrastructure. Subsequently, an avenue for future water service protocols in real-world contexts was also outlined.

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Flow Forecasting Informed Surface Water Abstraction for Improved Resilience of Water Supply Systems

Mohammed Yassin

Presenter:

Authors:

James Shucksmith, Mohammed Yassin, Vanessa Speight and Alemayehu Asfaw

Ensuring the resilience and security of water supply will be one of the most significant challenges facing the UK water industry over the next 50 years. The development of new water resource options are costly, hence the need to develop techniques to maximise the potential and resilience of current water resource assets without compromising environmental regulations. The availability of hydrological and meteorological data from radar and sensor technologies combined with high computational capabilities provide a potential to use real-time monitoring and modelling to increase abstraction volumes without compromising environmental licences. The work describes a novel technique to develop and integrate probabilistic flow forecast models and water resources management models that incorporate various operating rules to represent real-world operational constraints. To evaluate such an approach, a retrospective analysis of a dry period in 2011 is conducted, comparing historic abstraction and reservoir water level data at a case study abstraction site within a catchment in the UK with simulated abstractions based on forecasted flows, subject to the operational and environmental constraints of the site. This shows that on average 30 Ml/day of additional water over recorded levels could have been abstracted using the forecasting led scheme, without compromising environmental stream flow targets. The results show that rapid declines in reservoir levels during dry periods can be avoided by using the proposed approach. It is anticipated that such methodologies will be of increasing relevance under more sophisticated ‘dynamic’ abstraction regulations which may be implemented in future. Further work will seek to couple hydrological forecasting to more sophisticated water resource management models which may consider elements such as interacting storage systems, forecasted demand and energy use.

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Resilience Assessment of Water Distribution Systems under Demand Uncertainty

Xuyi Zhan

Presenter:

Authors:

Xuyi Zhan, Shuming Liu and Xue Wu

Resilience of water distribution systems is facing challenges of water demand uncertainty resulting from climate change and urbanization. To address this issue, this study presents a resilience assessment methodology for water distribution system. A resilience indicator is proposed to measure the system carrying capacity redundancy, which is calculated as one minus the ratio of current water demand to theoretical maximum designed water demand that meets the water supply requirement. The method is applied to a real-world case study for Changzhou network in China. In the case study, the future demand uncertainty is considered in two scenarios: the demand pattern increase proportionately or randomly. The nodal water demand are generated by Latin hypercube sampling. The influence of spatial demand pattern on system resilience is analysed by evaluating the capacity redundancy of a network under different spatial demand patterns. The results obtained from Changzhou network case study demonstrate that this system is relatively resilient to spatial demand pattern variation. It is expected that this method can identify unfavorable water pattern and support water distribution management.

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Safe & SuRe Decision Support Tool

Kate Baker

Presenter:

Authors:

Chris Sweetapple, Kate Baker, David Thomas and David Butler

The Safe & SuRe decision support tool is an output from a five-year Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) funded project on resilience in the water sector called Safe & SuRe. To date, conventional water sector planning has relied on the ability to predict future challenges and to focus on technical solutions to well-defined problems. However, the water sector will face major challenges over the coming decades, with many threats being less predictable. To successfully address these challenges, a transition is required to create sustainable and resilient urban water management. To successfully address these concerns and to view resilience in a holistic way the Safe & SuRe team developed the Safe & SuRe interventions framework which provides a diagrammatic representation of the relationship between threats and their consequences, and enables opportunities for interventions to increase the resilience of a water system to be identified. The Safe & SuRe project’s industry steering group suggested that a tool which automates application of the Safe & SuRe framework at various scales would be helpful to practitioners and decision makers in the water sector, and enable better informed choices to be made. Therefore, a decision support tool was co-developed with Scottish Water. The tool provides a better understanding of the relationships between threats, system failure modes, impacts and consequences that are relevant to a water system. Documenting this information enables the user (or team) to identify any opportunities to improve the resilience of the system and highlights the priority areas for intervention, which will assist in the high-level evaluation and comparison of interventions. Resilience is an important issue for the water sector in the UK and this tool enables resilience to be discussed in a holistic way.

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Dynamically Adaptive and Resilient Water Supply Networks, and the “End-of-Life” Single-Feed DMA

Ivan Stoianov

Presenter:

Authors:

Ivan Stoianov, Filippo Pecci, Dimitrios Nerantzis, Aly-Joy Ulusoy, Alexander Waldron and Caroline Blocher

This paper (presentation) explores the recent advances in the design and operation of water distribution networks with dynamically adaptive hydraulic conditions and connectivity. It summarises the mathematical optimisation methods that underpin the design and control of such networks. In addition, it explores an “evolutionary process” that allows water utilities to gradually migrate from single feed DMAs to dynamically adaptive DMAs through an intermediate stage of DMA-pairing. Two case studies are presented to illustrate this evolutionary process.

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The Nile Water, Food and Energy Nexus-A System Dynamics Model

Hamdy Elsayed

Presenter:

Authors:

Hamdy Elsayed, Slobodan Djordjevic and Dragan Savic

Water, Food and Energy (WFE) are inextricably linked and the action in one sector would not only affect that sector but could have significant impacts on the other sectors. The WFE Nexus is challenging in transboundary rivers. Due to rapid population and economic growth in the riparian countries, each riparian country plans to utilize its own resources to meet the growing demands for WFE. This might boost cooperation or increase the potential conflict among the riparian countries, that makes the Nexus is a suitable approach for studying the WFE in a transboundary river like the Nile basin in the context of the Nexus approach. A System Dynamics model was built for the entire Nile River to investigate the WFE conditions in the basin. The model was tested for sensitivity to determine the most sensitive model parameters. Moreover, the developed model will be used to investigate the future of the WFE in the basin through stochastic simulations. Different filling policies of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, the dam operation after the filling process and their implications on the WFE on the basin will be assessed in the context of the WFE Nexus.

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