Peter Chalk Centre

University of Exeter

Stocker Road

Exeter

EX4 4QD

Tel: +44 (0)1392 263637

E-mail: CCWI2019@exeter.ac.uk 

17th International Computing & Control for the Water Industry Conference

1st - 4th September 2019
University of Exeter, UK
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6D Building sustainability

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2.1-2.2

Trevor Bishop

Chair:

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Multiscale Resilience in Water Distribution and Drainage Systems

Kegong Diao

Presenter:

Authors:

Kegong Diao

Multiscale resilience, i.e. coordinating different scales within a system to jointly cope and mitigate risks on any single scale, is identified as the feature of a complex resilient system. However, it is still at the conceptual stage. This study provides a practical view of multiscale resilience in water distribution systems (WDSs) and urban drainage systems (UDSs), and demonstrates the development of multiscale resilience in the systems via case studies on real world WDSs and UDSs respectively. More specifically, water distribution and drainage systems are viewed as a number of hierarchically interconnected subsystems, and each hierarchy level refers to a scale. The larger scale refers to larger pipes serving both local users and some other users at smaller scales. However, smaller scales are not responsible for providing resilience to cope with failures in larger scales. To develop multiscale resilience, it requires two-way coordination among scales, i.e. to enable the smaller scales to support the larger scales too. This needs allowing water to travel reversely in the system via providing extra capacities at smaller scales and/or connections. This hypothesis is verified via case studies on a real world WDS and DS. As for the DS, enlarging smaller upstream pipes provides buffer capacities to accommodate excess water travelling back from downstream pipes due to surcharge and backwater effects. The multiscale resilient design achieves considerable cost saving (about 10%) and no loss in flood attenuation capacity via the multiscale coordination. For the WDS, using an extra connection to direct flow from smaller scale to larger scale reduces the duration and total amount of water supply shortage in the system during a failure event of losing the connection to the reservoir.

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The Nexus approach for water utilities: A case study from South West UK

Matthew Griffey

Presenter:

Authors:

Matthew Griffey, Nicola Hole, Petersen Carolyn, Lydia Vamvakeridou-Lyroudia, Ben Ward, Fayyaz Memon and Dragan Savic

The work to be presented will outline the development of the south-west UK case study for the SIM4NEXUS project, as undertaken by South West Water Ltd (SWW) and The University of Exeter. The primary aims of the UK case study are to better understand the complex interactions of the Water-Energy-Food nexus in the south-west region and to develop a decision support framework to facilitate integrated resource management in the context of policy and business planning. Water, land, food, energy, and climate are interconnected, comprising a coherent system (the ‘Nexus’), dominated by complexity and feedback. Putting pressure on one part of the Nexus can create pressures on the others. Management of the Nexus is critical to securing the efficient use of our scarce resources. Through the five nexus themes, SIM4NEXUS aims to predict society-wide impacts of resource use and relevant policies on sectors such as agriculture, water, biodiversity and ecosystem services through a model-based analysis. (From www.sim4nexus.eu)

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Comparative Study of Reliability Assessment Metrics for Water Distribution Networks

Gimoon Jeong

Presenter:

Authors:

Gimoon Jeong and Doosun Kang

Water distribution networks (WDNs) are essential infrastructures that supply drinking water over wide service areas. The basic goal of water supply is to satisfy sufficient water pressure and demand considering various uncertainties of demand change and component failures. Especially, maintaining water supply under the abnormal supply conditions should be examined to decide marginal network design and operation. The marginal network capacity is often interpreted as "reliability". A number of metrics were developed to quantify the WDNs reliability and they are grouped in several categories, such as topological/connectivity, entropy, and hydraulic. In this study, a new hydraulic reliability index is introduced and compared with several conventional metrics representing different reliability aspects. In applications, the proposed and various reliability metrics are estimated using several water networks with different topological characteristics, and compared by network performance analysis under pipe failure scenarios. Here, the network performance is analysed by system redundancy, robustness, and serviceability contexts.

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Increasing active citizen participation on water related issues

Ljiljana Marjanovic-Halburd

Presenter:

Authors:

Anna Strzelecka, Janet Riley, Leticia Ozawa-Meida, Richard Elelman and Ljiljana Marjanovic-Halburd

The EU-funded project POWER (Political and sOcial awareness on Water EnviRonmental challenges) is using digital media to build online water communities. The aim is to engage professional, politicians and citizens, all of whom can participate in sharing knowledge and addressing local water issues, by a combination of changing policies, applying best professional practices and modifying personal attitudes and behaviours. In the project a user-driven Digital Social Platform (DSP) was developed. It facilitates the digital involvement of communities in the processes of governance, dissemination, planning and decision-making. It provides water related information and advice to citizens in local communities in an easily accessible, timely manner. It facilitates interaction and knowledge sharing between citizens and local communities. It enables professionals and professional networks to share experience and best practice on water related challenges. Moreover, POWER DSP leads to innovative approach to citizen engagement at a municipal level, which would result not only in a more transparent and open form of local policy initiation and implementation but which would also lead to significant developments in inter-municipal knowledge exchange, a more coherent structure to the need for supranational policies to be better implemented at a city and district level and enhanced policy continuity and completion. This approach has been named by Elelman and Feldman, the Councils of Citizen Engagement in Sustainable Urban Strategies (ConCensus). The DSP focuses on four key water related issues: water scarcity, water quality, flood risk and variables related to water conservation, in four different Key Demonstration Cities (KDC): Milton Keynes, Sabadell, Leicester and Jerusalem. This paper presents the partial results of the POWER project where the ConCensus approach was applied to the four KDC. The results from the initial ConCensus workshops conducted in 2018 as well as follow-up workshops conducted in the first quarter of 2019 will be presented.

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Stochastic Multi-objective Resilience Management Framework for Urban Water Distribution Network Considering Future Uncertainties

Queen Suraajini Rajendran

Presenter:

Authors:

Queen Suraajini Rajendran and Sai Hung Cheung

This paper aims to develop a Multi-Objective optimization design framework using stochastic algorithms. It is necessary to expand the existing network to match the demand imposed by the change in environment while meeting the long-term sustainable development goal. Hence, there is always a need to consider more than one performance metrics in design, strength, operation and expansion of water distribution network under varying demand uncertainty. The contribution of this research work is the consideration of future uncertainties in multi-objective optimization framework for resilient and flexible water distribution network design for designing, operating, strengthening and expansion. The scenarios of future demand along with uncertainties corresponding to climate change, urbanization and population growth are simulated separately using non-stationary climate model and urban growth model respectively. The non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-II (NSGA-II) is used as optimizer to generate the Pareto optimal solutions for water distribution network. The proposed approach is applied to determine the optimal resilient design of water distribution network in the city of Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia by considering multiple objectives simultaneously. The optimization framework gives the probabilistic estimate of several optimized designs for water distribution network. The merit of different design alternatives is assessed considering the trade-offs between multiple objectives. The results suggest that the framework could be used to manage multiple resilience objectives simultaneously for water distribution network under uncertainty. The computational efficiency of the proposed method in optimizing large real-world water distribution network is also discussed. The proposed approach can be used for solving decision making problems efficiently and subsequently to devise a new investment plan for the future infrastructure.

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