Peter Chalk Centre

University of Exeter

Stocker Road

Exeter

EX4 4QD

Tel: +44 (0)1392 263637

E-mail: CCWI2019@exeter.ac.uk 

17th International Computing & Control for the Water Industry Conference

1st - 4th September 2019
University of Exeter, UK
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • Instagram

8B Flood modelling & maangement

Please note the time shown on this page is automatically adjusted by the server according to the time zone set in your computer.

Green

Fayyaz Memon

Chair:

to

Emergency flood evacuation route modelling: A pilot case study

Senthil Gurusamy

Presenter:

Authors:

Senthil Gurusamy and David Butler

Flooding is one of the most frequent and damaging natural disasters to affect the UK. It has the potential to cause fatalities, displacement of people, damage to properties and the environment. Evacuation flood route planning is an important part of city emergency planning and should be based on detailed understanding of flood vulnerable areas and lines of communication. This paper presents a framework that integrates a flood inundation model with an evacuation routing model to develop optimal routes to relocate the affected population to the nearest designated evacuation points. The knowledge and implementation of evacuation routes will help reduce population vulnerability and improve flood resilience.

to

Assessment of vulnerability to flood hazard in the city of Monza: application of the NEWFRAME methodology

Enrico Creaco

Presenter:

Authors:

Claudia Quintiliani, Giovangiuseppe D'Acunto, Giacomo Galuppini, Marcello Arosio, Mario Martina and Enrico Creaco

Urban Flash Floods have been the subject of numerous research endeavours in recent years. They have been attracting lots of interest in the scientific community because, in comparison with rural cultivated and uncultivated territories, urban areas have exposed elements of much higher value. Therefore, flood risk assessment plays a crucial role in this context, due to the need of planning and adopting mitigation measures. This need is increasingly urgent due to the current trends of climate change and urbanization, which are leading to the growth of runoff flow rates in urban catchments. This paper presents the results of work package 3 (WP3) of the NEtWork-based Flood Risk Assessment and Management of Emergencies (NEWFRAME) project funded by Cariplo. This project aims to develop a new framework for flood risk assessment, which considers connections between exposed elements. The case study chosen for the project is the city of Monza, which has a high level of vulnerability. In fact, besides problems related to the insufficiency of the urban drainage system, Monza suffers from periodic inundations due to the flooding of the river Lambro, which crosses the urban centre. Inside the project, WP3 aims to set up the urban Urban Flash Flood Model, based on the following components: intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves, hydrographs of rivers Lambro, rainfall/runoff transformation in the urban centre, 2D flow routing of inundations. The output of WP3 is also shown in terms of flooded areas in the city of Monza for different return periods.

to

Integrated model for flood forecasting and river inundation in Taiwan

Mahdieh Dibaj

Presenter:

Authors:

Mahdieh Dibaj, Albert Chen, Akbar Javadi, Mohammad Akrami, Raziyeh Farmani, Yih-Chi Tan, Yongjun Lin and Kai-Yuan Ke

Taiwan was hit by Typhoon Morakot in August 2009 resulting in significant damage and losses. About two-third of the counties were affected among which, Kaohsiung City and Pingtung counties located in Kaoping River basin were damaged strongly. Overtopping of the Kaoping river banks due to river inundation could increase the vulnerability of these counties. Although structural measures are widely adopted for flood protection in Taiwan, the structures can only cope with flooding up to their design standards. To mitigate the impact of flooding at extended scale, non-structural measures such as flood plain zoning, flood hazard mapping, flood warning, and flood forecasting have become critical options. Preparation of these measures depends on the understanding of the consequence of flooding, which can be simulated using flood inundation models, which can be accomplished by one dimensional (1D), two dimensional (2D) and coupled 1D- 2D numerical models. This work presents the development of a fully coupled hydrodynamic model using MIKE Flood integrating 1D river model (MIKE11) and 2D Digital Elevation model (MIKE 21) for the Kaoping River as a case study in Taiwan.

to

Using SWMM5.1 to Develop a Stormwater Quality Model for a Small Town in Canada

Ana Sofijanic

Presenter:

Authors:

Ana Sofijanic, Michael Hulley, Daniela Loock and Yves Filion

This study is based on a small town located in a national park in the western Canada. The town is seeking to improve its long-term stormwater management capabilities and is interested in having a model that can inform future management actions. Stormwater from the town ultimately drains to a major river via local creeks and lakes that have sensitive aquatic ecosystems, so conservation of water resources is of high priority. The model must represent the town’s unique site given its location, climate, land cover and its function as a tourism destination with the visitor population reaching three times the resident population during peak season. A stormwater monitoring program was conducted in the town and samples were collected at major outfalls for a number of wet and dry weather events. The results were used to model pollutant parameters as well as conduct model calibration. They also guided the selection of preliminary solutions ranging from source control to end-of-pipe strategies, which will be further developed using the calibrated model. This study presents the development of a stormwater model using SWMM5.1 to simulate total suspended solids (TSS) loading in one of the town’s catchment areas. The model was simulated for a wet event during peak tourist season (July) to replicate the most critical TSS loading conditions according to the monitoring data. Pollutant build-up and washoff coefficients were adjusted for sensitivity analysis. It was found that buildup coefficient had high sensitivity to TSS loading so it was adjusted for model calibration to produce TSS loading that matched the monitoring results. The same model development procedure will be applied for the remaining catchments in the town and these will be used collectively to fine-tune the proposed controls in support of a formal stormwater management plan.

to

On the inner structure of discontinuities in porous shallow water equations

Giada Varra

Presenter:

Authors:

Giada Varra, Veronica Pepe, Stefania Fontanella, Renata Della Morte and Luca Cozzolino

The Porous Shallow water Equations are commonly used to evaluate the propagation of ?ooding waves in the urban environment. They admit not only classic flow discontinuities (shocks) but also contact discontinuities where the porosity varies abruptly. At porosity discontinuities, an internal boundary condition must be prescribed by de?ning the microscopic structure of the jump. The 1-d porous Shallow water Equations formally coincide to the 1-d Shallow water Equations in variable-width rectangular channels, and the porosity discontinuity is equivalent to a channel width discontinuity. This implies that the 2-d SWEs can be used to study the effect on the Riemann problem solution of the porosity discontinuity microscopic structure. The comparison of the dam-break solutions presented clearly shows that the structure of the Riemann problem solution strongly depends on the microscopic structure of the porosity through the standing wave. Different numerical approaches as Single Porosity (SP), Integral Porosity (IP) and Dual Integral Porosity (DIP) are based on different standing wave definitions. Notably, the monotonic variation of the porosity through the discontinuity characterizes classic SP numerical models, while the non-monotonic variation is assumed in the IP and DIP numerical models. The most appropriate standing wave definition must be used in the case at hand when the practical applications are tackled.

to